SSNAP


SSNAP

SSNAP is a small charity that supports sick and premature babies, and their families across the South West at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford.

The charity provides emotional and practical support to families during what can be a traumatic time when their babies are being cared for in the neonatal unit.

SSNAP also funds innovative and life-changing medical equipment that ensures babies are receiving the best care possible during their time at the John Radcliffe Hospital.

One of the parents supported by SNNAP, Veronika, told us:

“At 23 weeks, I had some unusual symptoms. I started bleeding and my husband called an ambulance. I was examined by a doctor and told I was in labour.

In that moment my husband and I were broken. We thought it must be impossible for a baby born at 23 weeks to survive. As soon as Alex was born he was taken to the NCU. We were frightened, stressed and heartbroken.

The staff introduced us to SSNAP. We live 24 miles from the hospital, but SSNAP arranged accommodation for us nearby. Most importantly, the team spent hours with us and introduced us to other parents in the same boat as us. It gave us hope.

Without SSNAP I genuinely don’t think we could have coped. Alex is now eight months old and doing amazingly well.”

Global’s Make Some Noise is proud to support the charity’s Family Care Team, allowing the charity to extend support hours into evenings and weekend for parents and siblings of babies in the neonatal unit at the hospital.

The support provided by the Family Care Team is vital. When babies are born premature or are very unwell parents and siblings can find this time to be traumatic, upsetting and difficult to handle both emotionally and practically.

The Family Care Team are on hand at the hospital to help in any way they can, from providing emotional support to a space for families to rest so that they can be close to their babies.

With your help, we can support SSNAP many more charities across the UK.


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Help improve the lives of disadvantaged children and young people across the UK